What’s The Difference Between Subsidized and Unsubsidized Loans?

Subsidized And Unsubsidized Loans

When you pay for school with federal student loans, the loans are either Direct Subsidized Loans or Direct Unsubsidized Loans. What’s the difference between Subsidized and Unsubsidized Student Loans?

Subsidized loans do not accrue interest while you’re in school, and the federal government pays any interest on your behalf. In contrast, unsubsidized loansaccrue interest while you’re in school. Therefore, if you qualify, you can save more money with subsidized student loans than with unsubsidized loans.

Compare The Best Student Loan Refinance Rates For 2020

Lender
APR
Minimum Credit
1.99% – 6.99%
650

Overview

KeyValue
Variable Rates:1.99% – 6.89%
Fixed Rates:3.20% – 6.99%
Minimum Credit Score:650
Minimum Income:None
Fees:None
Minimum Loan Amount:$5,000

Details

KeyValue
Eligible Loans:Private & Federal
Eligible Degrees:Undergraduate & Graduate
Loan Terms:5-20 years
Borrower Residency:All States except DE, KY, NV
Unemployment Protection:Yes
Co-signer Option:No
2.39% – 6.69%
680

Overview

KeyValue
Variable Rates:2.39% – 6.01%
Fixed Rates:3.14% – 6.69%
Minimum Credit Score:680
Minimum Income:$35,000
Fees:None
Minimum Loan Amount:$15,000

Details

KeyValue
Eligible Loans:Private & Federal
Eligible Degrees:Undergraduate & Graduate
Loan Terms:5, 7, 10, 15, 20 years
Borrower Residency:All States
Unemployment Protection:Yes
Co-signer Option:Yes

1.99% – 7.02%
660

Overview

KeyValue
Variable Rates:1.99% – 6.65%
Fixed Rates:3.50% – 7.02%
Minimum Credit Score:660
Minimum Income:None
Fees:None
Minimum Loan Amount:$5,000

Details

KeyValue
Eligible Loans:Private & Federal
Eligible Degrees:Undergraduate & Graduate
Loan Terms:5, 7, 10, 15, 20 years
Borrower Residency:All States
Unemployment Protection:Yes
Co-signer Option:Yes

1.90% – 8.59%
680

Overview

KeyValue
Variable Rates:1.90% – 8.59%
Fixed Rates:3.49% – 7.75%
Minimum Credit Score:680
Minimum Income:$24,000
Fees:None
Minimum Loan Amount:$5,000

Details

KeyValue
Eligible Loans:Private & Federal
Eligible Degrees:Undergraduate & Graduate
Loan Terms:5, 7, 10, 15, 20 years
Borrower Residency:All states, except ME, ND, NV, RI, WV
Unemployment Protection:Yes
Co-signer Option:Yes

2.31% – 7.36%
650

Overview

KeyValue
Variable Rates:2.31% – 7.36%
Fixed Rates:3.46% – 7.36%
Minimum Credit Score:650
Minimum Income:None
Fees:None
Minimum Loan Amount:$5,000 ($10,000 in CA)

Details

KeyValue
Eligible Loans:Private & Federal
Eligible Degrees:Undergraduate & Graduate
Loan Terms:5, 7, 10, 15, 20 years
Borrower Residency:All states
Unemployment Protection:Yes
Co-signer Option:Yes

1.99% – 7.02%

660

Overview

KeyValue
Variable Rates:1.99% – 6.65%
Fixed Rates:3.50% – 7.02%
Minimum Credit Score:660
Minimum Income:None
Fees:None
Minimum Loan Amount:$5,000

Details

KeyValue
Eligible Loans:Private & Federal
Eligible Degrees:Undergraduate & Graduate
Loan Terms:5 – 20 years
Borrower Residency:All states
Unemployment Protection:Varies
Co-signer Option:Yes

Checking Your Rate Doesn’t Affect Your Credit Score
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What is a Direct Subsidized Loan?

Direct Subsidized Loans are federal student loans that do not accrue interest while you’re in school because the federal government pays the interest for you. Subsidized loan are available to undergraduate students with financial need. Your school determines the amount of subsidized loans that you can borrow based on your financial need.

For subsidized student loans, the U.S. Department of Education will pay the interest on a Direct Subsidized Loan:

  • When you are enrolled in school at least half-time;
  • For a “grace period” of six months after you leave school; and
  • When you defer, or postpone, student loan payments

For example, let’s assume you borrow $10,000 of subsidized student loans during school. When you graduate, you will owe $10,000 of subsidized loans. This is because no interest is added to your loan balance while you’re in school and for six months after during your grace period. Once your grace period ends, you will start to make payments and will owe interest.

Direct Subsidized Loans: Advantages

  • The U.S. Department of Education pays the interest on your loans so long as you’re enrolled half-time and have financial need.
  • No payments are due until six months after graduation or after your leave school.
  • The federal government pays your interest during forbearance and deferment.
  • You have to demonstrate financial need.
  • Annual loan limits are lower compared to unsubsidized loans.
  • You must be an undergraduate to qualify.

What is a Direct Unsubsidized Loan?

Direct Subsidized Loans are available to both college and graduate students, and interest accrues while you’re in school and during grace periods. You don’t have to demonstrate financial need, and your school determines how much you can borrow based on the cost of attendance and the amount of financial need that you receive.

If you choose not to pay the interest while you’re in school, during grace, forbearance or deferment periods, then your interest will be capitalized, meaning that your interest will be added to your principal balance.

Direct Unsubsidized Loans: Advantages

  • Both undergraduate and graduate students can receive Direct Unsubsidized Loans.
  • You don’t have to demonstrate financial need to qualify.
  • You can borrow higher loan limits compared with Direct Subsidized Loans.

Direct Unsubsidized Loans: Disadvantages

  • You have to pay interest during school, grace periods, and during forbearance and deferment.

What’s the difference between subsidized and unsubsidized loans?

Subsidized and unsubsidized loans are both student loans that are issued by the federal government. However, there are critical differences that could impact how you borrow for college and graduate school.

Subsidized Loans vs. Unsubsidized Loans: Overview

SubsidizedUnsubsidized
Who can borrowUndergraduate studentsUndergraduate and graduate (and professional)degree students
How to qualifyMust demonstrate financial needFinancial need is not required
How much you can borrowLower loan limits compared to unsubsidized loansHigher loan limits compared to subsidized loans
Does interest accrue in school?NoYes
Does interest accrue during the grace period?NoYes

Here are the primary differences between subsidized loans and unsubsidized loans:

Subsidized: Undergraduate students who are enrolled at least half time.

 

Unsubsidized: Undergraduate, graduate and professional students who are enrolled at least half time.

Subsidized: You must demonstrate financial need.

 

Unsubsidized: You do not need to demonstrate financial need.

Subsidized: Annual loans limits vary each year based on your year in school, including undergraduate or graduate, and whether you are considered dependent or independent for tax purposes. Subsidized loan limits are lower than unsubsidized loans limits. For undergraduate student loans, the annual limit ranges from $3,500 to $5,500. The aggregate limit for subsidized loans for undergraduate students is capped at $23,000. All graduate students are considered independent students, so there are no dependent graduate students who can borrow subsidized loans.

 

For independent students, the annual limit ranges from $3,500 to $5,500 for undergraduate students. For undergraduate students, the aggregate amount of subsidized loans you can borrow is $23,000. For graduate or professional students, the aggregate amount of subsidized loans you can borrow is $65,500.

 

Unsubsidized: Annual loan limits vary depending on your year in school. The limits for unsubsidized loans are higher than for subsidized loans. For example, the maximum borrowing amount for a dependent undergraduate is $31,000, and up to $23,000 of this amount may be for subsidized loans. The maximum borrowing limit for independent undergraduate students is $57,500 (of which $23,000 may be subsidized loans) and $138,500 (of which $65,500 may be subsidized loans) for graduate or professional students. 

Subsidized: The current fixed annual percentage yield (APR) for undergraduate subsidized loans disbursed on or after July 1, 2019 through June 30, 2020 is 4.53%.

 

Unsubsidized: The current fixed annual percentage yield (APR) for unsubsidized loans disbursed on or after July 1, 2019 through June 30, 2020 is 4.53% for undergraduate loans; 6.08% for graduate or professional loans; and 7.08% for PLUS Loans.

Both subsidized and unsubsidized loans have fees. The fees are equal to a percentage of the total loan amount. When you borrow federal student loans, these fees are deducted from each loan that is disbursed to you while you are in school. Therefore, the loan amount that you receive is less than the loan amount that you borrow.

 

Subsidized: The fee for Direct Subsidized Loans and Direct Unsubsidized Loans disbursed on or after October 1, 2019 through October 1, 2020 is 1.059%.

 

Unsubsidized: The fee for Direct PLUS Loans disbursed on or after October 1, 2019 through October 1, 2020 is 4.236%.

Subsidized: Subsidized loans may be used for up to 150% of the length of your academic program. For example, if your academic program is four years, you can use subsidized loans for up to six years. If your program is two years, for example, you can use subsidized loans for up to three years.

 

Unsubsidized: There is no time limit to use unsubsidized loans.

How much can you borrow for subsidized vs. unsubsidized loans?

Your school will determine how much of subsidized and unsubsidized student loans that you can borrow each academic year.Both subsidized and unsubsidized loans have annual loan limits and annual aggregate limits. The amount you can borrow each year may be limited by your year in school and whether you are considered dependent or independent for tax purposes.

Subsidized vs. Unsubsidized Loans: Annual Loan Limits

Dependent StudentsIndependent Students
Undergrad: 1st Year $5,500 (up to $3,500 may be subsidized loans)$9,500 (up to $3,500 may be subsidized loans)
Undergrad: 2nd Year$6,500 (up to $4,500 may be subsidized loans)$10,500 (up to $4,500 may be subsidized loans
Undergrad: 3rd Year$7,500 (up to $5,500 may be subsidized loans)$12,500 (up to $5,500 may be subsidized loans)
Undergrad: 4th Year$7,500 (up to $5,500 may be subsidized loans)$12,500 (up to $5,500 may be subsidized loans)
Graduate or ProfessionalN/AYes $20,500 (all unsubsidized)
Aggregate Limit$31,000 (up to $23,000 may be subsidized loans)Undergrads: $57,500 (up to $23,000 may be subsidized loans)

Graduate/Professional: $138,500 (up to $65,500 may be subsidized loans)

How interest accrues on subsidized and unsubsidized loans

Interest of your subsidized and unsubsidized loans accrues differently depending if you are in school, in a grace period, or in deferment.

Here is how interest accrues on subsidized and unsubsidized student loans:

Subsidized vs. Unsubsidized Loans: How Interest Accrues

SubsidizedUnsubsidized
In SchoolInterest paid by federal governmentInterest accrues starting when loan is disbursed
Grace PeriodInterest paid for six months after graduation or after you leave schoolNo payment is due for six months after you graduate or leave school, but interest will accrue and be added to your loan balance
DefermentYou can pause payments temporarily, and the federal government pays the interestInterest accrues while payments are paused and is added to your loan balance

How to get subsidized and unsubsidized loans

The best way how to get subsidized and unsubsidized student loans is to complete the FAFSA, or the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. This is the form that the federal government, states, colleges and universities use to award financial aid.The FAFSA is free to complete and is required to borrow federal student loans, including subsidized and unsubsidized loans.

If you qualify, you want to borrow the maximum amount of subsidized loans before you borrow unsubsidized loans because the federal government will pay the interest for you while you’re in school, a grace period or deferment. Maximize your scholarships and grants as well. If you need additional funds to pay for school, private student loans are another option. If you don’t have a credit history, you can apply with a qualified cosigner.
A qualified cosigner with good to excellent credit and stable income may help you get approved for a private student loan and receive a lower interest rate. Private student loans are different from federal student loans, so make sure to compare lenders, interest rates and loan terms before borrowing. Often, private student loans have lower interest rates than federal student loans, including compared to PLUS Loans.

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